Announcements

September 2, 2021

Call for Participation: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist

Applications are invited for participation in the final event in our series of advanced institutes on text analysis, sponsored by the Northeastern University Women Writers Project with generous funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. These events introduce teachers and researchers at varied levels of expertise to the text analysis methods and interpretive questions arising from word embedding models, which represent connections between words as computable spatial relationships. These institutes will explore practical techniques and also interpretive outcomes, working with simple, open-access web tools hosted in the Women Writers Online Lab, as well as RStudio.

This program includes four institutes, three of which have already taken place in 2019 and 2021 (see our list of past events). The remaining event is an intensive institute focused on pedagogical uses of word vectors, including coverage of RStudio and the challenges of teaching command-line tools in a humanities context. The institute will be held virtually over five days (12:30–5:00 Eastern each day). Following the institute we will have a three-month period of virtual discussion and consultation with WWP staff and fellow participants to ensure that these challenging concepts and techniques can be thoroughly internalized. Participants will be encouraged to share research and teaching outcomes (syllabi, assignments, blog posts, research papers) and will be given the opportunity to post preliminary results and work in progress on the WWP blog.

We’re now inviting applications for the final event. For information on how to apply, and for more detailed information on the workshops, please see here.

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Intensive, Teaching-focused
Virtual event hosted at Northeastern University, May 16–20, 2022
Application deadline: January 31, 2022
Participants notified by February 25, 2022

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this project, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

June 15, 2021

Five New Texts Added to Women Writers Online

We are pleased to announce that we have added five new texts to Women Writers Online: Aphra Behn’s 1688 Oroonoko, Eliza Haywood’s 1728 The Agreeable Caledonian, M. Marsin’s 1700 Good News to the Good Women, Chloe Russel’s 1800 The Complete Fortune Teller and Dream Book, and Hannah Wolley’s 1668 A Guide to Ladies, Gentlewomen, and Maids.

These texts reflect the breadth of women’s engagements with social and political concerns, and highlight the chronological range of the WWO collection. Several also connect with the WWP’s current grant project, “Representing Racial Identity in Early Women’s Writing,” funded by Northeastern’s TIER 1 program, with co-PIs Professors Nicole Aljoe and Julia Flanders. The WWP will soon be publishing a substantial set of additional texts by women of color or thematizing race as part of this grant project. For more on this project, see “Representing Race in the Early Modern Archive” by Cailin Roles.

June 17, 2020

Eight New Texts Added to Women Writers Online

The WWP is delighted to report that we have added eight new texts to Women Writers Online: Lady Maria Callcott’s 1814 Letters on India, Mary Elizabeth Davis’s 1839 The British Partizan, Maria Edgeworth’s 1800 The Barring Out and Castle Rackrent, Eliza Haywood’s 1726 The City Jilt, and Mary Wollstonecraft’s 1796 Letters Written during a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. We have also added two new folders from the Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson, created in partnership with the editors of The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: A Scholarly Digital Edition: Folder 29, a brief Almanack with three dated entries from 2 October 1853 to 17 September 1855; and Folder 32, six manuscript sheets written from 6 December 1846 to 23 March 1847.

These new texts show how early women writers engaged with matters of gender, empire, and colonialism, while participating in political discourse on an international scale. For example, Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent is a complex and arguably anticolonialist historical novel that offers an Anglo-Irish view of the state of Ireland under British rule, while Callcott adopts a utilitarian stance for the information in her her Letters on India, saying that the work was “written solely with the design of being useful to such as are called upon to go at an early period of life, to India.” Wollstonecraft’s letters are both travel narrative and memoir, with extensive consideration of philosophical matters and examinations of women’s role in society. Wollstonecraft writes of her daughter, Mary: “I feel more than a mother’s fondness and anxiety, when I reflect on the dependent and oppressed state of her sex. I dread lest she should be forced to sacrifice her heart to her principles, or principles to her heart.”

While all of the files have been proofed, because of the COVID-19 pandemic we are unable to complete our full set of review procedures for The City Jilt, Wollstonecraft’s Letters, and The British Partizan. We will finalize these files as soon as we are able to return to our offices.

See here for a full list of the texts in WWO and here for a list of more recently-added titles.

March 2, 2020

Women Writers Online is Free for the Month of March

Update: We know that many classes have been disrupted due to the COVID-19 outbreak, so we wanted to share that we will be keeping Women Writers Online free until April 17th.

In celebration of Women’s History Month, Women Writers Online will once again be freely available during the month of March. We invite you to explore and enjoy the more than 420 texts in the collection!

If you haven’t visited WWO before, there are multiple ways to discover new texts. For example, you can filter through texts based on genre and publication year or use the search bar to look for specific keywords. You can also go to our open-access collections Women Writers in Review and Women Writers in Context and browse the themes and topics there for subjects you’re interested in, since both collections link back to the texts in WWO. You can see our recently published texts here. We also have a short blog post with some good places to get started in the WWO collection.

November 18, 2019

Five New Texts Added to Women Writers Online

The WWP is delighted to report that we have added five new texts to Women Writers Online: Margaret Cavendish’s 1664 CCXI Sociable Letters, Eliza Fay’s 1817 Original Letters from India, Lucy Hutchinson’s 1679 Order and Disorder, Sarah Jinner’s 1659 The Woman’s Almanac, and Jane Wiseman’s 1702 Antiochus the Great.

These texts cover three centuries of women’s writing in many different forms and genres, including drama, poetry, epistolary writing, science, religious theory, and natural history. They highlight the broad range of ways that women engaged with the scholarship of their times. For example, Cavendish’s CCXI Sociable Letters is offered to those who are “Masters of Learning” and includes her thoughts on a wide range of subjects, including science and medicine, while Jinner’s Almanac begins with an explicit wish that her text will foster women’s scholarship: “The gift of learning being so little set by in these days amongst those of our Sex, is the chief invitation which hath caused me to publish this final Tract, thereby to stir up others, not to let their great worth with other learned Authors of our Sex ly in obscurity.” In a similar fashion, the preface to Fay’s account speaks of the growing number of women who, “fearless of the critical perils that once attended the voyage, venture to launch their little barks on the vast ocean through which amusement or instruction is conveyed to a reading public.”

See here for a full list of the texts in WWO and here for a list of more recently-added titles.

September 19, 2019

Call for Participation: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist

Applications are invited for participation in a new series of advanced institutes on text analysis, sponsored by the Northeastern University Women Writers Project with generous funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. These events will introduce teachers and researchers at varied levels of expertise to the text analysis methods and interpretive questions arising from word embedding models, which represent connections between words as computable spatial relationships. These institutes will explore practical techniques and also interpretive outcomes, working with simple, open-access web tools hosted in the Women Writers Online Lab.

This program includes four institutes, of which one has already taken place in July 2019 [https://wwp.northeastern.edu/outreach/seminars/wem_2019-07/]. The remaining events are: :

  1. An introductory institute focused on pedagogical uses of word vectors, using the WWP’s web-based Women Writers Vector Toolkit
  2. An intensive institute focused on research uses of word vectors, offering a thorough, well-scaffolded introduction to RStudio through commented code samples that can be adapted for use in participants’ own work
  3. An intensive institute focused on pedagogical uses of word vectors, including coverage of RStudio and the challenges of teaching command-line tools in a humanities context

Both the introductory and intensive events are intended to stand on their own, although participants are welcome to attend both, space permitting. Each event will be followed by a period of virtual discussion, consultation, and support. Participants will share research and teaching outcomes including syllabi, assignments, blog posts, and research papers.

Each institute will begin with a three-day in-person event, followed by a three-month period of virtual discussion and consultation with WWP staff and fellow participants to ensure that these challenging concepts and techniques can be thoroughly internalized. Participants will be encouraged to share research and teaching outcomes (syllabi, assignments, blog posts, research papers) and will be given the opportunity to post preliminary results and work in progress on the WWP blog.

Travel funding is available of up to $500 per participant.

We’re now inviting applications for the second and third events. For information on how to apply, and for more detailed information on the workshops, please see here.

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Introductory, Teaching-focused
Northeastern University, May 20–22 2020
Application deadline: January 24, 2020
Participants notified by February 14, 2020

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Intensive, Research-focused
Northeastern University, July 15–17 2020
Application deadline: January 24, 2020
Participants notified by February 14, 2020

We will soon be announcing dates for the final event:

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Intensive, Teaching-focused
Northeastern University, July 2021 (precise date to be determined)
Application deadline: March 19, 2021
Participants notified by April 16, 2021

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this project, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

June 20, 2019

Five New Texts Added to Women Writers Online

The WWP is delighted to report that we have added five new texts to Women Writers Online: Sarah Butler’s 1716 Irish Tales, Elizabeth Craven’s 1789 A Journey through the Crimea to Constantinople, the third volume of Eliza Haywood’s 1720 Love in Excess, Mary Ann Parker’s 1795 A Voyage Round the World in the Gorgon Man of War, and Maria Riddell’s 1792 Voyages to the Madeira and Leeward Caribbean Isles.

These five texts highlight early women’s engagement with global, political, social, and scientific concerns. Butler prefaces her tales of medieval Irish heroism with the statement that the Irish “altho’ they may seem so now, in the Circumstances they lie under, (having born the heavy Yoke of Bondage for so many Years, and have been Cow’d down in their Spirits) yet…once Ireland was esteem’d one of the Principal Nations in Europe for Piety and Learning.” The travel narratives authored by Maria Riddell are accompanied by extensive naturalist writings that describe a wide range of plants, animals, and geographic features. Different socioeconomic perspectives are also evident in these texts, which include one travel narrative by Lady Elizabeth Craven, a noblewoman who was also granted the title “Princess Berkeley,” and another by Mary Ann Parker, a nurse whose account was written to help support “a numerous family.” Finally, the third volume of Haywood’s bestselling novel explores different modes of women’s desire.

See here for a full list of the texts in WWO and here for a list of more recently-added titles.

Women Writers Online is Free for the Month of March!

In celebration of Women’s History Month, Women Writers Online will be freely available during the month of March. We invite you to explore and enjoy the 411 texts in the collection!

If you haven’t visited Women Writers Online before, there are many different ways to find new texts. For instance, you can try filtering by genre or by publication year. The keyword search box is another good way to begin exploring. Or, you might want to go to our open-access collections Women Writers in Review and Women Writers in Context and browse the themes and topics there for subjects you’re interested in, since both collections link back to the texts in WWO. If you have worked with WWO in the past, you might want to see our recently published texts here. Finally, we have a short blog post with some good places to get started in the WWO collection.

February 3, 2019

Call for Participation: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist

Applications are invited for participation in a new series of advanced institutes on text analysis, sponsored by the Northeastern University Women Writers Project with generous funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. These events will introduce teachers and researchers at varied levels of expertise to the text analysis methods and interpretive questions arising from word embedding models, which represent connections between words as computable spatial relationships. These institutes will explore practical techniques and also interpretive outcomes, working with simple, open-access web tools hosted in the Women Writers Online Lab.

We plan four institutes in all:

  1. An introductory institute focused on research uses of word vectors, using the WWP’s web-based Women Writers Vector Toolkit
  2. An introductory institute focused on pedagogical uses of word vectors, using the WWP’s web-based Women Writers Vector Toolkit
  3. An intensive institute focused on research uses of word vectors, offering a thorough, well-scaffolded introduction to RStudio through commented code samples that can be adapted for use in participants’ own work
  4. An intensive institute focused on pedagogical uses of word vectors, including coverage of RStudio and the challenges of teaching command-line tools in a humanities context

Both the introductory and intensive events are intended to stand on their own, although participants are welcome to attend both, space permitting. Each event will be followed by a period of virtual discussion, consultation, and support. Participants will share research and teaching outcomes including syllabi, assignments, blog posts, and research papers.

Each institute will begin with a three-day in-person event, followed by a three-month period of virtual discussion and consultation with WWP staff and fellow participants to ensure that these challenging concepts and techniques can be thoroughly internalized. Participants will be encouraged to share research and teaching outcomes (syllabi, assignments, blog posts, research papers) and will be given the opportunity to post preliminary results and work in progress on the WWP blog.

Travel funding is available of up to $500 per participant.

We’re now inviting applications for the first event. For information on how to apply, and for more detailed information on the workshops, please see here.

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Introductory, Research-focused
Northeastern University, July 17-19, 2019
Application deadline: March 22, 2019
Participants notified by April 19, 2019

We’ll soon be announcing dates for the remaining three events:

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Introductory, Teaching-focused
Northeastern University, May 2021
Application deadline: January 24, 2020
Participants notified by February 14, 2020

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Intensive, Research-focused
Northeastern University, July 2021
Application deadline: January 24, 2020
Participants notified by February 14, 2020

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Intensive, Teaching-focused
Northeastern University, July 2022 (precise date to be determined)
Application deadline: March 19, 2021
Participants notified by April 16, 2021

Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this project, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

December 11, 2018

Four New Texts Added to Women Writers Online

The WWP is delighted to report that we have added four new texts to Women Writers Online: Margaret Bingham’s 1768 Verses on the Present State of Ireland, Elizabeth Heyrick’s 1824 Immediate, Not Gradual Abolition, Elizabeth Wast’s 1785 The Most Remarkable Passages in the Life and Spiritual Experiences of Elizabeth Wast, and the first volume of the 1767 novel The Female American, authorship unknown.

These four texts highlight how women engaged with political and religious issues of their times: for example, Bingham’s poem is designed to “raise compassion in the breast of power” and ameliorate the “unhappy situation of the people of Ireland, both as to trade and religion.” Heyrick’s pamphlet is equally intended to have an immediate political effect, arguing that: “the perpetuation of slavery in our West India colonies, is not an abstract question, to be settled between the Government and the Planters,—it is a question in which we are all implicated;—we are all guilty, (with shame and compunction let us admit the opprobrious truth) of supporting and perpetuating slavery.” The Female American offers a Robinson Crusoe tale from the perspective of a female biracial indigenous protagonist, who both upholds—and problematizes—nationalism and colonialism in the early republic. Finally, Wast’s memoir presents a detailed portrait of the religious experiences of a seventeenth-century Scottish woman who worked as the mistress of the Trades Hospital in Edinburgh.

August 17, 2018

The WWP Receives Funding for “Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist”

The WWP is delighted to report that we have received $197,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities’s Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities program to support “Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist: Institutes on Critical Teaching and Research with Vector Space Models,” a series of four three-day institutes that will explore the use of word embedding models for textual analysis.

This grant builds on a generous seedling grant from Northeastern’s Tier One program. The NEH award will fund a series of advanced workshops to introduce teachers and researchers at varied levels of expertise to the text analysis methods and interpretive questions arising from word embedding models, which represent connections between words as computable spatial relationships. Use of word embedding models in the humanities is still fairly recent, and tools for working with them are mostly limited to the command line. These institutes will explore practical techniques and also interpretive outcomes, working with simple, open-access web tools hosted in the Women Writers Online Lab. We plan four institutes in all: two focused on teaching and two focused on research, with an introductory and intensive event for each. Each event will be followed by a period of virtual discussion, consultation, and support. Participants will share research and teaching outcomes including syllabi, assignments, blog posts, and research papers.

These institutes build on the Women Writers Project's extensive curriculum of digital humanities workshops and also expand on our program of support for experimental humanities pedagogy using digital tools.

June 20, 2018

Four New Texts Added to Women Writers Online

The WWP is delighted to report that we have added four new texts to Women Writers Online, including Anna Seward’s 1780 Elegy on Captain Cook and Elizabeth Sarah Gooch’s 1788 An Appeal to the Public. We have also added two new folders from the Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson, created in partnership with the editors of The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: A Scholarly Digital Edition. Folder 26, written when MME was 72 years old, is a brief and incomplete Almanack in which MME mentions her health having recently improved, which she attributes to horseback rides in the winter cold; her unworthiness as a Christian (a recurring theme in the Almanacks); and paying neighborly visits, presumably, given the year-end date, during the holiday season. Folder 42, written c. 1825–1826, was a birthday gift from MME to her nephew Ralph Waldo Emerson and is written as a dialogue between Plato and “Ancestor”—MME’s father, Reverend William Emerson (1743-1776)—who represented for MME the embodiment of both a Revolutionary War hero and the five generations of Emerson clergymen who also served as leading figures in their communities.

For older announcements please see our archive.